[sticky entry] Sticky: Fic Masterlist

Jan. 21st, 2011 01:58 pm
netgirl_y2k: (Default)
Blanket permission: Please feel free to remix, podfic, or really do anything you like with anything I've written. I'd love it if you'd drop me a link when you're done, though.

Whoniverse )

Merlin )

Game of Thrones/A Song of Ice and Fire )

Misc. fandoms: Legend of the Seeker, Discworld, Being Human, The West Wing, Warehouse 13, The Queen's Thief, Once Upon a Time )

Crossovers & Fusions )

Femslashex

Oct. 22nd, 2017 02:46 pm
netgirl_y2k: (brand new day)
Well, that was fun!

I got two really lovely gifts. We Could Be Heroes, a Jessica Jones role reversal AU (I effing love role reversal AUs) where Trish is the one with powers, and Jessica is, well, Jessica. And obloquy, a Game of Thrones story where Yara and Ellaria, who were very much hard done by in S7, get the happy ending they deserve, frequenting brothels and scandalising the lords of Westeros. I am a very lucky girl!

And it wasn't written for me, but the Pride and Prejudice Mary/OFC fic The Part of Her Hair is one of those fics that just makes fandom a richer place.

I have been trying to do more exchanges this year, and the results have been, em, hit and miss. My fault, not that of anyone who's written anything for me. This has just not been a year of me doing my best work. That said, I think the fic I wrote for this is a bit good.

I got a request for Root/Shaw fic without any particular prompts, so I decided to write the finale fixit that I'd been meaning to write since last year. The lion's share of post finale Root/Shaw fics seem to go the route of the Machine and Root having faked Root's death in order to goad Harold into action; a fanon I can never get behind because 1) that's stupid, and 2) Root would never, not after what Shaw went through with Samaritan. So I went with the more traditional fixit: that obviously fatal gunshot wasn't nearly as bad as it looked, la la la. Also, I killed Harold, not because I don't like Harold, but because Reese and Finch dying together had been set up since the pilot, and what were they playing at not following through on that?

Schrodinger's Simulation
So, Schrodinger's simulation, it's simple: if Root lives, this is real; if she dies, it isn't.

Or,

Root survives, Shaw is a terrible nurse, and the Machine has some identity issues.

Books

Oct. 10th, 2017 06:09 pm
netgirl_y2k: (brand new day)
Wonder Woman: Warbringer - Leigh Bardugo
Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine - Gail Honeyman
What Happened - Hillary Rodham Clinton
SPQR - Mary Beard
The Ruin of Angels - Max Gladstone
Waking Gods - Sylvain Neuvel


DC's new, shiny thing is hiring Young Adult authors to write YA novels about their headliners, of which Warbringer was the first instalment. It had a couple of things working against it for me: I am super fussy when it comes to YA, and I've bounced pretty hard off Leigh Bardugo's work before. It also features a slightly different Themyscira from the movie, which felt like a mistake with the book following so hotly on its heels, and an actualfax teenaged Diana, which, um. That said, it was a fun adventure, it neatly sidestepped the het romance I was dreading, and the teenaged characters were fine, even though they were, you know, teenagers...

Hey, I think I've just put my finger on why most YA doesn't work for me!

I can't say I've much interest in the upcoming Batman or Superman books in the same series, but I will probably tag back in for Sarah J. Maas' Catwoman instalment.

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine is about a woman in Glasgow who grew up in care, has no understanding of social niceties, and is in massive denial about how lonely she is... then she accidentally makes a friend. As someone who doesn't have the best social skills (but is certainly more cognizant than Eleanor of where I'm going wrong) my levels of secondhand embarrassment reading this were off the charts like whoa. But once I got over that it really was a very lovely, very uplifting book.

My first reaction to What Happened was that I wasn't going to read it, but I would defend to the death Clinton's right to have written it. I mean, it's not like Hillary Clinton is the first politician to have lost an election, or the first to have written a book about it. I don't know what it is about her specifically that makes people think that she should put her herself out to sea on an iceflow, accompanied only by that woman from Game of Thrones shouting SHAME. Just kidding. Of course I know why that is, everyone knows why that is.

Then bits of it started leaking out, and it seemed like she was mad at all the same people I was mad at, and baffled by all the same things I was baffled by, so I picked it up. It opens on election night, and I immediately started bawling like a baby. I'm still baffled by the reviews that called it an exercise in deflecting blame, because she accepts responsibility in this, she accepts so much responsibility that by the end I was going 'okay, it was your fault, I get it, enough already.' Mostly the book is her going: 'I was the candidate, the buck stops with me. But this was a weird election, and other things were happening. Here are some of them.' Which seems more than fair to me.

It did veer into the saccharine in places, mostly where she was talking about religion, but that might have been me being British and going 'ew, get this religion off my politics, it's all sticky'. And she does go on a fair bit about having won the popular vote, which is fair enough; in her position I would have had that tattood on my face.

I kind of want to say you done fucked up, America, but I feel like you already know that.

I have never been that interested in ancient Rome, but I have been extremely fond of Mary Beard ever since she got publicly lambasted for daring to go on Question Time looking like how you'd expect an oxbridge classics professor to look, while also being a woman, and shortly thereafter doing a BBC series on Calligula while wearing gold lame converse because zero fucks were given.

Anyway, SPQR was very readable, even for someone who picked it up more out of feminist feeling for the author than interest in the subject matter.

I've talked before about how much I love Max Gladstone's godpunk Craft sequence, and on paper The Ruin of Angels should have been my favourite; it featured library heist and all the relationships were f/f, but it felt like the flaws of the previous books were writ large in this.

The worldbuilding always was the best thing about this series (and it is seriously fucking awesome) but here it felt like the books were starting to crumble under the weight of all that worldbuilding. The plot, such as it was, felt like we were just moving from one worldbuilding set-piece to another until everything happened in the last fifty pages. And the characters desperately tried to avoid telling each other plot relevant information in case that accidentally created some story momentum.

On the upshot, there's an admin demon who considers taking bloody, demonstrative action to stop people erroneously flagging intra-office mail as triple urgent, and a lady knight who breaks her lady love out of prison with the line: knights can rescue their ladies from towers; that's practically what knights are for.

Basically, there's individual moments of brilliance interspersed through a sea of meh.

Waking Gods is the sequel to Sleeping Giants which I'd really loved a couple of months ago. It's plot can be summarised thusly: what good does a giant, unstoppable robot do you when the other guys have thirteen giant, unstoppable robots? Both books are told through interviews and log entries, and even if I'm not totally sold on the SF plot, they are super quick, super twisty, super fun reads.

(Graphic novels were Bombshells: Enlisted, and The Mighty Thor: Thunder in her Veins, both of which I got a hell of a kick out of. Because I am new to comics, and because there are so many, while I am but one person, my method to winnowing them down to the ones I might want to read is: no dudes need apply.)
netgirl_y2k: (brand new day)
One of the reasons to be glad my sister is visiting is that she gave me her Netflix password so that I could watch the first two episodes of the shiny new Star Trek.

Discovery )
netgirl_y2k: (winter is coming)
Earlier this year I tried to game my sign up in an exchange, failed badly, and found myself writing a fic about the Baratheon brothers at The Wall, focused on Renly, who by a very small margin I find the least boring of the three. (Brother, It's Cold Outside.)

[archiveofourown.org profile] prodigy remixed it into the Stannis centric Black Horns, White Snow which I liked a lot; Stannis' bitterness at Ned was darkly hilarious, and it fixed some issues with Stannis' characterisation that I felt my original had.

My remixee was [archiveofourown.org profile] The_Plaid_Slytherin who writes a lot of fic about Stannis, all of it good, and all of it skated right over my eyeballs because even after all my years in ASOIAF fandom my feelings about Stannis are still mostly: Who? What? Huh?

Writing fic about characters you don't like doesn't necessarily have to be hard (there's a difference between having a different take and bashing, obviously, and you should try to stay on the right side of that) but what is hard is fic about characters whose existence you struggle to remember.

I do understand why people get irked when it seems obvious that your remixee has scrolled through your works looking for one of these things which is not like the others (I've had it happen to me) but sometimes with remixes it's unavoidable, because sometimes the answer to the question how would I write this fic? is simply I wouldn't.'

I ended up remixing a short fic about Loras and Margaery bonding (For The Best) into a Margaery character study. For the Best (My Church Offers No Absolutes Remix).

As a remix it's less than ideal, but on the plus side I was writing it just as the show pulled Rhaegar and Elia's annulment out of its ass, and I managed to channel my annoyance into the line: Many men came to care little for their wives, that was why the laws of gods and men made it all but impossible for a husband, king or commoner, to set his lawful wife aside.
netgirl_y2k: (brand new day)
1. My little sister is visiting from the Republic of Ireland. She was in a pub in Dublin, and a couple of people asked her what she was doing in Ireland, and she said: "I'm British. I've come to take your land." And then she had to go to the airport and flee the country immediately. Well, no. I mean, yes but no. She's on loan back to a Scottish university to work on a project she doesn't want to be on, for a senior academic that she doesn't much like, for a grand total of zero pounds sterling (something holding references and publications over her head something something.) Sometimes I think about the difference between having a job and having a career, and at the moment I think it's that when I have to do things I don't want to do, at the behest of people I don't like, I at least get paid for it.

On her first day back, she was on a bus where somebody threw a bicycle at the driver, who stood up and chased him down the street. And because she hasn't been living in Glasgow for a couple of years she considered this 'weird' and 'frighting', and not 'a good reason to be late for work' or 'a tuesday'. So I've been loaning her my car, and as my car is held together by string and happy thoughts (that, of course, being the other big difference between having a career and a job) I'd warned her to keep an eye out for any of the engine management lights coming on. Anyway, cue later that night when she called frantic because there was a light on the dashboard that wouldn't go off. It was the handbrake light. She hadn't let the handbrake off, and it was the handbrake light. I love her.

2. I have had Freya - ridiculous mostly labrador, much loved bane of my existence, and reason for getting out of bed on mornings when I just want to go nope - for three years now, and to celebrate my mum made her a birthday cake. Liver & kidney, which, yes, is as disgusting as it sounds. It's worth noting that I have passed thirty-four birthdays on this green Earth, and my mother has yet resisted any temptation to make me a birthday cake.

I've actually been having some behaviour problems with Freya. Earlier in the summer she was attacked by two Vizslas (a couple of stitches in her eyelid, a bad fright, and me nearly coming to blows with the owner.) But ever since then she's been determined to get her revenge in first with almost every female dog she meets.

In almost all respects I think dogs are better than people, but you can't explain female solidarity or internalised misogyny to a dog; then again, you can't explain those to most people, so maybe we'll call that one a draw.

And she's still a total pet with people, so.

3. It occurred to me that I'd never actually made use of the Netflix free trial. I watched Below Her Mouth (porn, basically), a bunch of Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries (the best hangover telly there has ever been or will be), two seasons of You Me Her (actually really good), a season and a half of iZombie (I thought the first season was awesome; during the second I thought that the joke that Liv basically becomes the person whose brain she'd eaten was wearing thin, and I didn't give a rat's ass about anything that was going on with Major.)

I tried the first episodes of Santa Clarita Diet (too gross) and One Day at a Time (too much laugh track) but nah.

But the bigger thing was that Netflix has half-assed its crackdown on vpns, so while you can't watch anything, you can see how much better the US version is, kind of killing any desire I had to shell out for the clearly inferior UK version.

4. I have been on this thing of writing for more exchanges in 2017, and honestly, I'm not sure this has been leading to my best work: Exhibit A: my contributions to [community profile] auexchange

Truth, Justice, and a Really Good Dental Plan (Brooklyn Nine-Nine, Superhero AU)

"What I'm saying is: do you think they're trying to Avengers Assemble us? Collecting New York's finest superheroes, and---"

The elevator doors dinged open, revealing Hitchcock and Scully.

"--'Kay," said Jake. "Never mind."


The Morning After the War Before (Person of Interest, Everybody Lives AU)

Sometimes Root wasn't sure that they hadn't lost the war after all, and that she wasn't living out some digital afterlife in the best simulation the Machine could come up with.
netgirl_y2k: (kahlan white dress)
Mona Lisas and Mad Hatters by [personal profile] st_aurafina (Person of Interest; Root/Shaw, Reese/Finch, 52k, Sentinel AU)

In 2001, Harold advised on a project called Cascade, not knowing he was a Guide himself. Years later, he and John, a Sentinel on the run from Cascade, must help Shaw, who has just lost her own Guide when the Project turned on her. Complicating matters is Root, searching for Harold's Machine and interfering with their rescue of Shaw.

THIS IS SO GOOD, YOU GUYS. I don't know the sentinel & guide trope from adam, but this slots it into PoI canon super neatly without ever feeling like it's being explained to you. And is basically just long, and in character, and really super delightful.

Perimeter Oscillations by [archiveofourown.org profile] architeuthis (DC movies; Lois/Diana; 14k)

On the trail of a mythological beast, Diana runs into Lois Lane, who is pursuing her own investigation.

Lois Lane is the saving grace of the DCEU's take on Superman, and this gives such good Lois.

Etta Candy's Last Stand by [archiveofourown.org profile] sanguinity (Wonder Woman; Etta/Diana; 2k)

This is the way Etta is going to die: trapped between a bed and Diana Prince’s breasts.

If you are having a bad day and puppy pictures just aren't cutting it for you, read this fic, I promise it will make you feel better. It is just super delightful.

Books

Sep. 7th, 2017 12:34 am
netgirl_y2k: (brand new day)
Behind the Throne - KB Wagers
Children of Time - Adrian Tchaikovsky
The Humans - Matt Haig
Sleeping Giants - Sylvain Neuvel
Mongrels - Stephen Graham Jones


I really wanted to like Behind the Throne. It's about a gunrunner who is dragged back home to become empress of her Indian inspired matriarchal space empire; I should have liked it, but it's just... not very good. Firstly, it's meant to be set in a space faring society, except this has little to no relevance on the plot, and on the rare occasions that they actually mention spaceships or aliens it actually throws you out of the story because you have to stop and go 'oh yeah, they're in space, I'd forgotten'. There's literally nothing to distinguish it from a generic, earthbound fantasy story; they're fighting saxons, for fuck's sake. At least there's palace intrigue, I told myself; bland, predictable, telegraphed from a mile away palace intrigue. The heroine is a hyper-competent, green-haired, natural leader, who everyone instinctively follows; so far so generic YA heroine, and the fact that she's thirty-eight does nothing to change this. Did I mention that her full name is Hailimi Mercedes Jaya Bristol (My Immortal flashbacks, anyone?), and yet she's thirty-eight, and this book appears to have been marketed towards people who aren't thirteen?

Yeah, I didn't like it.

Luckily Children of Time was an excellent pallet cleanser. So, thousands of years in the future a decadent humanity decides to seed a planet with some monkeys infected with a virus that will accelerate their evolution and intelligence enabling humans to have monkey butlers when they finally colonise the planet. Except. Except all the monkeys die on impact, the humans never arrive, and the virus infects the local spiders. The book follows the developing spider society as they discover God, atheism, and gender equality (the male spiders would like the females to stop killing them after sex, please and thank you). Intercut with this are the last refugees from a dead Earth, navigating a hostile universe, and slowly realising it's the planet of the spiders or extinction.

I was Team Spider, but you should make up your own mind.

The Humans is about an alien who takes over the body of a mathematician without knowing anything about life on Earth and has to navigate his baffling life in Cambridge. It was also written following the author's struggle with depression, and is an ode to how life can seem awful and baffling and pointless, but there are always dogs, and peanut butter sandwiches, and Beach Boys songs, and maybe the little things can be enough until you get a handle on the big things.

I can see how some people might find it twee, but I thought it was lovely, not least because one of my coping methods for brain weasel attacks genuinely is: but, dogs!

Sleeping Giants is about parts of a mysterious, impossible giant robot being found buried under the earth and the quest to assemble it, and is told pretty much exclusively through interviews with a shadowy man-in-black figure. Two things, 1) this was a super quick, super fun, super well-written read, and 2) it's the first instalment of a series, and I can easily see how the aliens planted a giant robot on prehistoric Earth storyline could easily go off the rails, so I'm reserving judgement.

I will for sure read book two though.

Mongrels was a time jumping, steam of consciousness tale about a boy coming of age in a family of werewolves. Now, I know I'm not interested in stories about young men coming of age, and I hardly ever like werewolf stories as much as I think I'm going to, so it's no surprise I didn't love this, but I can see how it would work hella well if this was more in your wheelhouse.

(Graphic novels were Wonder Woman: Love and Murder which is exactly as bad as you'd expect Diana written by Jodi Picoult to be, and Captain Marvel: Higher, Further, Faster, More, Stay Fly & Alis Voltat Propriis which started fun and charming, and then went off the rails giving me a taste of what it feels like when a story you've been merrily following gets highjacked by an event you haven't the foggiest about.)
netgirl_y2k: (Default)
Eight episodes was probably a good length for The Defenders, both because it made for a quick watch and because it was, like, an inch deep.

The Defenders )

Given the way this season has been going I should probably talk about the last couple of episodes of Game of Thrones before the finale either leaks or some intern at HBO accidentally posts it.

GoT, eps 5 & 6 )
netgirl_y2k: (doctordonna)
My dad's just recently retired and he needs something to do, so he's been going round asking us all what we do for hobbies. And because 'I scream about fictional lesbians on the internet with like minded strangers' seemed like the wrong answer I suggested he could maybe get a dog. Dog ownership is very relaxing, I assured him. Unfortunately I said this shortly after telling him a long, elaborate story about the time I took Freya to Skye for the day, and she charged into the sea in pursuit of seals, freaked out when she was hit by a wave, and I had to wade in hip deep to rescue her.

I stand by my larger point that dogs, by and large, are relaxing. I just happen to own the rarer highly stressful, if often hilarious variety.

I think I've said before that Freya's small for a labrador (that pesky spaniel ancestor again) but she is still the size of a springer spaniel. And although I had her neutered ages ago (the thought of a house full of little Freyas made me want to weep) there's obviously something about her that brings all the boy dogs to the yard. Her latest suitor is a teacup chihuahua x pomeranian called Sid, who I am seriously concerned Freya is going to squish if she doesn't realise he's behind her with his nose up her arse and sits down on him. God loves a trier, as my granny always said. And if Freya hadn't had the op I would be tempted to get the wee guy a stepladder and just wait to see what the puppies turned out like.

And tragically not dog related, a fic I have written:

The Princesses in the Tower (Elia Martell & Arianne Martell; ASOIAF)

King's Landing swallows Dornish princesses and chokes on their bones.

Or,

Rhaegar wins, Elia lives, and is not a happy bunny.
netgirl_y2k: (brand new day)
My work is meant to have four shift patterns: early, backshift, split shifts, and nights. For the last six weeks I have been working secret option number five: bizarre shifts, which is just a grab bag of random shifts, with no rhyme or reason to them. Maybe it was that, or maybe it's been the Scottish summer weather, unpleasant humidity interrupted by occasional torrential downpours, that resulted in my having a brain weasel attack the other week.

Someone showed me a picture they'd taken of me; it was of two large dogs trying to sit on my lap at the same time, and I looked at it and thought: that would be a cute photo if not for the giant troll woman in it, and then I thought: huh?? because I thought I'd dealt with my self loathing issues, except of course I haven't. I live in a house with no mirrors and don't let anyone take my photograph. That's pretty much the opposite of having dealt with it.

The really annoying thing is that intellectually I know I'm not actually a troll. I'm on the goofy looking side of normal looking. Interesting looking, if you like that kind of thing. And more importantly I'm kind, well intentioned, good with dogs, and generally hilarious. And yet. I see one picture of myself and I'm too depressed to leave the house for two days.

The second really annoying thing is that as much as this is in my head, it's also very much not only in my head. There's a fair amount of societal reinforcement that's gone on. The first time I remember being called fat happened round about the age that I was old enough to start remembering anything at all. Then there's the cat calling; I haven't been traditionally cat called since my student days, but what I always got more of was the version where guys would pretend to puke at the sight of me, which was as lovely as it sounds. And it comes from the same place as all other cat calling: that your appearance is there for public comment, regardless of how unwanted, unsolicited, cruel, or actually frighting.

Anyway, so that was a two day brain spiral that I could have lived without. And I'm fine now. As much as the internet is a warren of terrible mental health advice one of the things I've found legitimately useful is anthropomorphising my unhealthy thoughts as brain weasels. I'm much better now at going: disregard that thought, it wasn't real. Bad weasel! Go away!

Books

Aug. 1st, 2017 01:36 pm
netgirl_y2k: (Default)
To Kill the President - Sam Bourne
Out on Good Behaviour - Dahlia Adler
Six Four - Hideo Yokoyama
Under the Udala Trees - Chinelo Okparanta
New York 2140 - Kim Stanley Robinson
Marriage of a Thousand Lies - SJ Sindu


To Kill the President does exactly what it say on the tin: fictional!Mattis and fictional!Preibus plot to kill fictional!Trump. And you kind of have to admire an author who back in November when the rest of us were still going wait, what? went: if I start writing now I could be crying into my royalty checks by this time next year, so.

My preferred sort of romances are regencies, but given that no one wants to write me lesbian duchesses in love (why don't you love me, publishing?) I will grudgingly settle for Out on Good Behaviour, a contemporary romance about a pansexual college student and a closeted southern lesbian navigating a relationship. It was actually very sweet, I just really want the lesbian duchesses.

I'm assured that Six Four is a very popular Japanese crime novel. Maybe it lost something in translation, or maybe I just wasn't here for six hundred pages of the internal squabbling of the Japanese police department. Ah, well, sometimes trying to broaden your reading horizons doesn't work. It's always good to try.

Under the Udala Trees is set in the aftermath of the Nigerian civil war, and follows the life and loves of a lesbian in the newly united country. It gets dark in places, but never as dark as I worried it would; I was really worried about sexual violence, which thankfully didn't happen. And it actually ends as happily as it possibly could given that it's still not safe to be gay in Nigeria. Recommended.

I find Kim Stanley Robinson's books hit and miss, but New York 2140 I totally loved. To summarise: it's a century in the future, sea levels have risen until New York is largely underwater, lets all fuck capitalism! Highly recommended.

Marriage of a Thousand Lies is about a marriage of convenience between a gay Indian man and the lesbian daughter of Sri Lankan immigrants, except it wasn't really about that nearly as much as I wanted it to be. It was a lesbian romance about reconnecting with your first love, except it wasn't about that either. It was about life as second generation immigrant, except that kind of got lost beneath the other two go-nowhere plots and a third unnecessary storyline about a missing sister. It wasn't a bad book by any stretch of the imagination, it was just sort weightless and screamed debut novel.

I continue dipping my toe into comic books with The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl Beats Up the Marvel Universe and Wonder Woman: The Hiketeia. Despite being a newcomer to all this I am miffed (miffed, I say!) that the actress cast as Doreen Green is skinny.

nvm

Jul. 16th, 2017 05:01 pm
netgirl_y2k: (doctordonna)
Disregard everything I said last night about no longer caring about Doctor Who, I care so much I've just had a little cry from how much I care.
netgirl_y2k: (Default)
1. I have a guest dog this weekend. An acquaintance from the park had to go down south all of a sudden because of a death in the family, and as she had enough to deal without trying to wrangle a dog sitter I offered to take him.

Barnaby is an Australian Labradoodle, and so cute that I've been googling pictures of puppies from breeders, or at least I was until I saw the price tags attached to them, at which point I remembered that one of the reasons I got Freya in the first place is that I was offered her for the low, low price of free to a good home.

The other reason I've only got one dog, despite the fact that ever since I switched from split shifts at work I've thought that it might be nice for her to have a friend, is that Freya is a jealous wee besom. She's been sharing her toys and treats fine, they've been drinking out of the same water bowl, but every time I go to pet Barnaby she'll walk between us and shoulder him out of the way. Earlier he got brave enough to come up on the couch with me and Freya jumped up and bowled the poor little guy off as though he was a skittle.

This is why, despite Barnaby feeling like a literal cloud, I've barely gotten to pet him.

Barnaby is currently curled up on Freya's dogbed, and Freya is up next to me snoring like a freight train. I guess guarding me 24/7 from other dogs I might like to pet is tiring work.

2. They're announcing the actor for the Thirteenth Doctor after the tennis tomorrow, and I will be tuned in despite the fact that I haven't actually watched very much of this last season. I watched the first two or three episodes, and I've liked Capaldi as the Doctor, and Bill seemed cute, but I have harboured a dislike of Matt Lucas ever since Little Britain was fucking everywhere, and I couldn't get over them making fucking Nardol a backdoor companion.

Anyway, if they announce Pheobe Waller-Bridge (or, really, anyone who isn't a white guy) I will gladly jump back in, and if they announce Kris Marshall I can close the door on this part of my fannish life with nary a look back. I actually think Marshall is a better actor than a lot of people do (he's been serviceable tilting into good in Death in Paradise) but the casting of another tall, goofy looking white guy would represent such a failure of imagination on the part of the showrunners that it'd make it really hard for me to care.

3. For those of us who missed Remix, [community profile] remixrevival is here. Yay!
netgirl_y2k: (kahlan white dress)
Modern Magic Formula (Legend of the Seeker; Cara/Dahlia & Richard/Kahlan, HP AU)

School was a long time ago, and out here in the real world it's practically acceptable for a Slytherin to have a crush on a Hufflepuff.

Written for [community profile] everywoman, for [personal profile] shopfront who at the same time was writing me the most frickin' delightful Sara Lance fic (Etiology). Good times!

Brother, It's Cold Outside (A Song of Ice and Fire; Renly, Stannis & Robert)

One of Renly's earliest memories was of Robert threatening to beat the tears from his eyes. Stannis had replied that Renly had not eaten a full meal in a year on account of Robert's fool rebellion, and if Robert struck Renly, then Stannis would strike Robert.

Later, Stannis had beaten the tendency to weep from Renly himself, but Stannis and Robert's relationship had never recovered from that first, shocking display of fraternal defiance.


This was written for the GoT AU exchange, and was the result of of my unsuccessfully trying to game sign ups to get a different assignment, and having to write a fic about three characters I'd never given a second thought to, and I accidentally gave myself feelings.

(Note to self: stop trying to game sign ups; if you want to write something that badly, write it as a treat.)
netgirl_y2k: (gwen beer)
I suspect I might not be the only person who saw the reviews for Netflix's Gypsy, and thought that sounds terrible, I must watch it at once! Well, if you want to know how bad it is before watching, then pull up a pew.

Gypsy...Oh, boy )

Books

Jul. 2nd, 2017 01:15 pm
netgirl_y2k: (brand new day)
Fates and Furies - Lauren Groff
Everything Leads to You - Nina LaCour
Into the Water - Paula Hawkins
Nimona - Noelle Stevenson
American War - Omar El Akkad
Giant of the Senate - Al Franken
Hunger - Roxane Gay


Fates and Furies, or A Portrait of a Marriage Between Two Terrible Heterosexuals Who, Quite Frankly, Deserve Each Other. Lotto and Mathilde (and the fact that their names are Lotto and Mathilde tells you everything you need to know about them) are an upper middle class couple whose twenty year marriage is based on them having quite a lot of sex and both being mildly dreadful. Lotto (short for Lancelot, fucking Lancelot) is an eternal manchild, failed actor, and playwright so self-involved that he spends more than a decade failing to notice that his wife is rewriting his plays while he sleeps. Mathilde is the chick from Gone Girl, only lacking in any of the things that made the chick from Gone Girl compelling.

The writing is intermittently beautiful, and the rest of the time drips with pretension so thick you can practically taste it.

File under: fuck off.

Everything Leads to You was meant to be a palate cleanser, a sweet lesbian romance. Not unrelatedly, why are most f/f romances so shite? Even without the romance it hit one of the things I hate most in YA: characters who're still teenagers, yet live the lives of thirty year olds. The protagonist in this was still in high school, but she was also a set designer in Hollywood. Aye, right. And most of the book focused on her getting tapped to work on an indie movie. Now every time this indie movie is described you get the impression that all the characters and the writer herself think that this is some sort of cannes festival winning level genius, but everything you see about it makes it seem so twee that it would be laughed out of day one of an intro to screenwriting class.

Oh, and when we first meet the protagonist's love interest, she's homeless. But not real, actual homelessness where it's traumatic, and stressful, and terrifying, the type of homelessness that only exists in not very good novels where homeless shelters are like sleepaway camps, you make lots of new friends, and get cast in a not very good indie movie.

I mean, the spelling and the grammar is all correct, which hasn't always been true of all the f/f romances I've tried to read. But you could also have achieved the same effect by just writing the word MEH in five hundred point font.

Into the Water, or Another Book by that Woman What Wrote The Girl on the Train, was about a suspicious suicide and it was... fine. It got a little baggy in the middle in that way a lot of second novels do when the writer worked on their first book for ten plus years, and then had eighteen months to write the follow up. But while it could certainly have used a bit more tightening up, it wasn't so noticeable as to be a dealbreaker, or even particularly distracting.

It was more overtly feminist than The Girl on the Train, which I liked, but without the oh, fuuuck gotcha moment that made that book such a big hit. The twists here were all fine if guessable. If Paula Hawkins doesn't just want to retire and live off her The Girl on the Train swag then she has a bright future in front of her writing okay-ish thrillers.

My local library has found some money from somewhere to make themselves all fancy (and here I was thinking that the magic money tree only gave out to the DUP and the bloody royals) and as a result now has a pretty cool graphic novel section from which I picked up Nimona, a charming graphic novel about a young girl who apprentices herself to a supervillian, oh, and she can turn herself into a dragon when the situation calls for it. It was funny and lovely, and also seems to have been the thing that finally unlocked whatever it was in my brain that was stopping me from parsing graphic novels.

(That lock picked, I also read and enjoyed the first two Ms. Marvel trades and the first collection of the female Thor, which I'm mentioning in an aside because for esoteric and inexplicable reasons I'm not counting them towards my yearly total. Though this may change if I feel like my numbers need to be artificially inflated come December. Also, I don't really have anything to say about them except that, yeah, I consumed them and enjoyed doing so.)

American War was the first book in a while that I have really, really loved. The basic setup is that the US government has banned fossil fuels (seems unlikely given recent events, I know, but just go with it) causing several southern states to band together and declare independence kicking off the second civil war.

It's not about the war, per se, but about life as a refugee, and the indoctrination of child soldiers, and acts of terrorism, and it handles all of these topics with grace. Highly, highly recommended.

More than ten years ago I bought Al Franken's Lies and the Lying Liars Who Tell Them to give to my sister as a birthday present. Just as I was coming out of the bookshop I ran into a boy who I'd met for the first time at a party a few nights before. Because we were at uni together we decided to go for a quick pint to bitch about our upcoming exams. At four in the morning I crashed through my backdoor; us having hauled the Franken book around a number of bars and clubs for twelve hours, and one or both of us having been sick in the bag with the book in it. And that's the story of how I met my best friend, and also the story of how I had to buy the same Al Franken book twice.

In the years since Franken has become a senator, which I didn't know about because pre-Trump I didn't follow US politics with an ever mounting sense of WTF??? But once I realised he wasn't joking, he really is a senator, this was a read I really enjoyed. It's interesting, and funny without being facetious, and even if it wasn't those things it would still be worth reading for the Ted Cruz bashing.

Hunger is Roxane Gay's memoir about all the weight she gained after being gang raped at the age of twelve and fucking ouch. It's important and raw, and if you can read it you should, but fucking ouch.

I also DNF'd The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend which was about a Swedish tourist opening a bookshop in small town America, which I was expecting to be like a cross between Gilmore Girls and The Gurnsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society and had the charm of neither.
netgirl_y2k: (annie strong)
One of my shameful nerd/feminist secrets is that I bounced pretty hard off Margaret Atwood's writing. Like, I love Margaret Atwood as an idea, and I'm delighted that she exists out there in the world, but I've never especially enjoyed any of her books. In fact the only one that's ever really done anything for me is The Handmaid's Tale, and most of what it did was scare the bejesus out of me.

The other thing is that I have a new rule for watching telly, where if a season is, like, ten-ish episodes I'll wait till it's finished its run then I can consume it all over a week or so. This works well for shows like Orphan Black which work better for me when binged, but not at all when it came to The Handmaid's Tale, a show that needed some built in recovery time, and to be watched from behind your fingers with a strong drink to hand.

nolite te bastardes carborundorum )

Profile

netgirl_y2k: (Default)
netgirl_y2k

October 2017

S M T W T F S
1234567
89 1011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031    

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Oct. 24th, 2017 04:07 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios